Should You Move Before the Baby Comes?

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Pre-Move

When you learn that you are expecting, the excitement and joy can also bring the realization that you are in need of more space.  All the clothes and diapers, toys and bottles can take up a lot of space.  And depending on your current living situation, you might not even have a room to dedicate to a nursery.  As your family expands, many people decide it’s time to get into a larger home.  And while this decision can be easy, when to move can be a more challenging decision.  Should you pack up and move before the baby comes, or is it better to wait to move until after your bundle of joy arrives?  Deciding whether to move before your baby arrives is a personal decision.  There are pros and cons to moving before and moving after giving the baby comes.

Moving before the baby comes is the right choice for some.  Moving before your child arrives will give you time to set up your new home, including the nursery.  You will able to come home with your bundle of joy and not worry about having to deal with the stress of an upcoming move.  Additionally, when your nesting instinct kicks in, you will be able to focus that energy into cleaning and organizing your new home, instead of going into a frenzy at your half-packed home and again in your new abode.  Moving before your child arrives will allow you to search for a home and move on your schedule.  Once your baby is born, your child will run the show.  Feedings and napping may not be as conducive to home buying or loading up the moving truck.  Moving while pregnant can be an uncomfortable transition.  The aches and pains that come with carrying a child may be exasperated by added moving stress.  However, you will still have postnatal recovery once your baby is born.  Some bounce back quickly, but if your recovery takes longer than expected, you may have an uncomfortable move all the same.  Making any move is stressful though, and attempting one with a baby on the way can add extra strain. If the added stress is putting too much on you or your baby, it might be best to wait.  However, many who advocate for moving before a baby comes like being able to bring their newborn straight to the new home and focus solely on spending time as a family, not packing up and cleaning.

Waiting to move can allow you to focus on yourself and the birth of your child without adding the additional pressure moving brings.  You will be able to then change focus to packing and loading and getting to your new home as a family.  When you arrive at your new home, it will almost certainly need to be cleaned.  Making a postnatal move can make the cleaning process easier.  Some cleaning agents, particularly those with bleach or ammonia, pose a risk to pregnant women. While you could break out the vinegar, it will be easier to use your normal cleaning supplies and not have to worry if you wait to move until after the baby arrives.  While there will be a recovery period after you give birth, you will not be struggling with a burgeoning belly.  There may be discomfort and other aches and pains after giving birth, but you will not be trying to navigate with a baby bump or your little one kicking you all day.  Additionally, while you may be running on less sleep, newborns are typically easy to keep content.  Setting up a pack and play or swing will allow you to get to the cleaning and unpacking while your child can sleep or take in their new surroundings.  Waiting to move can pose a challenge though.  Any new parents will admit that the arrival of a child can bring stress and sleep deprivation.  While you may not have to deal with a big belly, you will need to multitask planning your move while caring for a newborn.

Ultimately, the choice to move before or after your baby arrives is a deeply personal decision.  Some families may be having a difficult pregnancy and not be up to the travel and stress that comes with a move.  Others may want to tackle the move and be able to bring their child straight home to a home that is set up, or at least mostly unpacked.  Distance may also factor in.  If you will need to fly, you may need to wait until after delivery to get to your new home.  Regardless of making a prenatal or postnatal move, it is important to not overburden your body.  It is a good idea to get help, because you will not be able to do most of the lifting, especially with heavy objects.  Consulting a doctor about your plans can help put your mind at ease, or maybe help you decide if you are up to a move before your child is born or if it is best to wait.

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